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Mary Emma Jocelyn diary, 1851-1852.

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Friday, November 28th Rainy. Was not very well. Caroline, with Kate Hudson, and Mary [Best?] spent the day at an Anti-Slavery fair in Brooklyn. George Hudson spent the evening with them and brought Carrie home about twelve o'clock and the young lady woke me from sound slumbers to give me an account of her adventures which I was to sleepy to think as interesting as she evidently considered them. In the meantime Harriet and I had had a very pleasant day together in chatting and sewing. Hannah [Wilde?] called early in the morning. Evening in reading.

Saturday. Warm and Pleasant. Soon after breakfast I called on Hannah [Wilde?] and Mary Reeve. Hannah wanted me to go to the Fair with her very much so finally I consented. It was nearly noon when we started. We took the stage on Fourth at which set us down at the door of Montague Hall, Brooklyn where the Fair is held. It was mostly [superintended] by colored ladies. Our design in coming was to assist by taking tables. We did so and sold about eight or ten dollars worth in the course of the evening. The ladies were very polite to us. The boys came over in the evening. Doctor Remmington made a speech. We left about half past eight. After I reached home I read the National Era and retired.

Sunday. Pleasant. Attended our church in the morning and evening Mr. Whiting preached in the morning.

Last edit over 2 years ago by vant
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Thursday December 4th. Spent the day as usual in sewing. In the [ev'ng?] Natty and I attended Lyceum together. [?] went with [?] Mr Noges? from Brooklyn delivered a very fine lecture on Hungary and Kossuth. The Lyceum was held in the [Babtist?] church which was crowded.

Friday. Rather warmer than it has been. This morning at one o'clock the illustrious Hungarian hero, Kossuth landed at Staten Island He was received with all the honors Inc to his noble character. His name is on every tongue and one and all unite in praising him. Mary Reeve made a long call in the afternoon. Attended prayer meeting at our church in the evening.

Saturday.. A most delightful day. About twelve o'clock A.M. Harriet and I crossed the ferry and went to Albert's rooms in Broadway to witness the triumphal entry of Kossuth into the city. Bells were ringing, guns were firing, business was partly suspended and flags and streamers floated from every thing that could conveinently hold them. The shipping looked very pretty thus ornamented. Broadway presented a magnificent spectacle The gateways of the park were covered with flowers and ribbons while [family?] statues, and flags of every nation ornamented the principal building Albert gave us seats at one of the windows and we waited patiently for about two hours before the gorgeous procession passed. Mr Murphy joined us just before it came. After the military had all gone by Kossuth appeared in a carriage drawn by six horses. He was standing up and bowing as he passed among the deafening shouts of the multitude.

[Text written on the left margin: [Sad?] and dignified was the sweet smile that played over his beautiful features and he appeared more like an angel than a man. He is the most noble & the most lovely, the most beautiful and the most [intensely?] interesting man I have ever seen

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Last edit almost 3 years ago by MRutherford
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Tuesday.. Rained in the morning but cleared off very pleasantly of noon. So soon after dinner I started for Brooklyn Reached Mary Jane's about three o'clock. Found them all well. Carrie was much pleased to see me. We called on Aunt Graves across the way before dusk returned in time for tea after which Louise played and sang very prettily for our entertainment.

Henry Hudson called about seven o'clock and accompanied Carrie and I to Mr Beecher's church where we heard an excellent sermon by the Rev Charles Finney on "Prayer" It suited Henry's case exactly -- nothing could have been more appropriate. -- I intended to return home with Henry in the evening but my cousins would not listen to such a proposition -- stay all night I must so at last I consented and Henry returned without me. Carrie and I slept together and talked an hour or two after retiring before we fell asleep.

Wednesday.. Delightful day... C-- and I rose early. Met the family at the breakfast table soon after seven. Breakfast was followed by family prayers. and at eight we attended a morning prayer meeting at Dr. Cox's church across the way. It continued an hour, we then returned, the children went to school, and Mary Jane, Carrie and I spent the morning in talking, reading, and sewing. I left at three o'clock P.M. and returned, as I went, by stage.

Last edit over 2 years ago by sieboldd
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Wednesday, July 21st. Very warm. Received a call from Mary Reeve in the morning - she came to bid me good bye as she leaves for the country this afternoon whither I hope soon to join her. Mary seemed rather melancholy, and half sorry to go though whether it was on mine or Joseph's? account I could hardly tell - probably on both. [Served? Sewed?] on a mantilla for Mother most of the day. Albert came over to tea and spent the evening. Kate seemed much interested in him - much more so than in the handsome Isaiah Caulbert who also passed the evening with us. It was very pleasant - Father and Mother seemed to enjoy it much. Albert, Isaiah and Carrie sang several pieces - Albert has his flute with him. How natural, and how much like old times it seemed to hear that flute pouring forth its sweet sounds on the evening air as it was wont to do when he ws home with us in the life of one household - before - oh Albert! would your sake that those days might come back again. Thursday. Weather the same. Harriet and Douglas reached home this morning safe and well. Hattie looks better, her trip has doubtless done her good. Douglas was evidently in high spirits - squeezed Carrie and I in an unprecedented manner and frolicked round with us all like a school boy Their meeting with Kate was quite an affecting one. Douglas [illegible?] to Brooklyn soon after breakfast and was absent till tea time. Hattie and Kate were closeted together half of the day, notwithstanding [?-found] times to relate a good many of her adventures to us all. Carrie and I received a letter from Harriet

Last edit over 2 years ago by TONeill
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were he not quite so sober, still I like him much, and so I fancy does our bright, gay little Mary, notwithstanding he is so different from herself. Love is a strange little God, but he did well in this case. Every body agrees that it is a firstrate match and also I believe they agree in giving me the credit of it. I hope they won't take me for a thorough going match - maker I only thought I would give them a start seeing it seemed very agreeable to both parties. and a start was all they wanted for they followed it up in short order Now they are engaged - then comes a wedding by and by, and then my best wishes accompany them as they progress hand in hand through the uncertain future. Well, to return, we walked through South 9th st[street] so First strolled along by the waterstill we were quite a distance out [illegible] Brooklyn side, then went up to Bedford avenue, through which we prominaded some time, and then returned. As we passed through this pleasant streets we saw that we were not the only [underlined] moonlight ramblers, and it was also quite evident [illegible] all the lovers in Wesburough did not belong to our party. Being much fatigued I retired immediately on reaching home

Last edit over 2 years ago by sheebe
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