Early modern recipe books

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Wellcome Collection: Fanshawe, Lady Ann (1625-1680) (MS7113)

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The Lady who gave me this Receipt told me that the good effects of the Powder was confirm'd to her by a French Minister here the boy toldThis part is scribbled out. who told [...] her that he had seen a very remarkable Cure perform'd in France with this powder on a Gentleman who had so Violent and Malignant a Humou[...]r fall'n on on one Arm, that after he had been ill some time of it, the Surgeons pronounc'd it must be cutt off, for they cou'd not save it from the Gangrene. The Gentle= =man wou'd not undergoe the operation, but resolv'd to dye. Upon which a Lady who was in the House with him undertook him. Gave him this Powder every 3 Houres, till the danger was over, & then Morning & Night. And with this alone she perfectly Cured him

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Folio page 208v, scrib's page 440.

To pickle fresh herrings

Mrs WindhamAttribtuion appears in left margin.Take threescore herrings and was them very clean and dry them in a clean cloth, and then lay them up on a table, and then take halfe a pound of bay salsand one ounce of black peper, 2 ounces of guinnee peper, and beat it in a mor ter and a small handfull of white salt and nix itt all together, and strow all a bout the herrings and then putt them into a pot with a few bay leaues and put to them three pints of white wine vine yard so bake them after the first batch of bread; lay them in your pot one by oneA flourish appears directly after the last word of the recipe, indicating finality.

To make fresh chees

Take a bottle of the best milk from the cow hott, put to it a pint of creme, soe much warmed as that is, and to this put a spoonfull of runnett, couer it close, when it is come Whey it well, and break it very well with four or 5 spoonfuls of rose water where in hath been steeped all night a little mace, cinamon, and nutmeg all bruised. tow spoonfuls of fin sugar, you must put to it. all this must b[...]e bruised and wrought together, (for itt will make tow) best it sand in the sellar all night, to pour on it you must boyle a quart of creme, with a little rose water, and lett it stand a and a night, then put the best of it on the fresh chees when you serue it upA flourish appears immediately after the p of "up," which probably indicates finality.

Folio page 209r, scribe's page 441.

To make ducth biskett

Lady LatkeisAttribution appears in left margin.Take 2 pound of fine flower, put in a quarter of a pound of powder sugar, than take a quarter of a pound sweet butter, rub it well in the flower putt in an ounce of caraway seeds and half a pint of yest (it must bee ale yest) then wett it with milk, then lett itt lye and rise a little while, then make it into little cakes the thickness of a wigg, lett it in the ouen and lett it stand half an hour, then take them out and cutt them thin then lett them in the ouen to broun again.A flourish appears after the period, which may indicate finality.

To make tarts the best way

Take a quart of the finest flower and half a pound off butter rubbed dry into the flower the white of one egg make it up with cold watter very quick role it out very thin and handle the past as little as posible, lay in one row of friut and one good spoonful of double refined sugar, when the tarts are made wash them ouer with melted butter and sears some fine sugar one them, bake them in a uery quick ouen and doo not putt up the stoue, as soone as they begin to colour they are enough, the cheef is to make them up exceeding thin and to shine att the topA flourish appears after the last word in the recipe, which probably indicates with finality that the recipe is done.

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The folio number is 209v, the scribe number is 442.

To make Aprycock cakes o orrange or leamen

Draw your Jelly and pare your aprycocks and [cut] them in slices and sett them on the fier withou any thing in them, lett them boil til they bee all soft, then take to a pound and half of apricoks, oune pound of Jelly, stirr them well together, and sett them ouer [the] till they bee Scalding hott ready to boil, then take your Sugar and heat it upon the fier in a [boule] or basin, and take the weight of your stuff in sugar and put it in stiring it over the fier till the sugar bee well mellted, and the glass your cakesThere is a flourish here at the end of the recipe.

Stav a Cough There is a change of hand with this recipe.

L:Denbigh. This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Make a Lambative of Linseed Oyle, and Syrop of Madenhair, and White Suger Candy, and take a Tea Spoon full when the [you] Cough, it must bee Made fresh every day.

The biber Tincture

Ms NevilThere is some kind of flourish under this attribution. Gentian Root one dram; of the [loses] of Centrey the Less, and Camomil flowers, halfe a handfull each, of Roman Wormwood a quarter of a handfull; put to it about a [quart] of boyling Spring Water, & when tis Could powr it [ot] into a bottle; Cover it only with a paper.

The folio number is 210r, the scribe number is 443.

To make orrange wine

Take 20 gallons of watter and 40 pound of sugar boile [...]tt over the fier and claryfy it & have ready 200 orringes (they must bee the best cevil oranges) pared very thin without any whitte: as soon as soon as you take of the sirrup putt in the pills, cover it very close & ring out the Juce of the oranges and when the sirrop is allmost cold put in all the Juce but no seeds & put tow or three spoonfuls of yest sett it 20 [...] 2 days then barrell it and putt to it 2 gallans of renish or white wine: stop it clos for a month: then [drawe] it of into a nother vesoll an in 2 or 3 days [after] bottle ittThere is a flourish here at the end of the recipe.

To make stichwort SSatter

There is what appears to be an accidental ink dot under the recipe title. Take of stonehort dung a good quantity and of Stichwort, and cover the bottom of the still with the dung and then lay a Layr of Stichwort & so doo till the still is full, then pour 2 quarts of white wine and 2 quarts of small ale and stop the still close and the next day still it off,you may draw of 3 ose of thes quantity and hang in the bottle a little of Saffron a bout a rpenny worth & lett itt bee in the bottle the watter is dr[...] it is no matter how often, lett the party drink nine spoonfuls att any time, when they are in pain it is allso very good for the stone sweetned with sirrup of marsmalosThere is a flourish at the end of the recipe here.

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The folio number is 210v, the scribe number is 444.

Orrange Cakes.

Mrs Eells. This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Take 12 larg Suiit Orranges, Chip off the outward peel as thin as you Can, then lay them in Water 2: or 3: days, Shifing it twice a day, then Cut them in halves, and take all the meat out Clean, boyl the peels, and Set your meat in a pot into a Scillet of Water, as for Clear Cakes, so let it boyl about an hour, then when the peels ar boyld tender, beat them prettey fine in a Morter, then Weigh your meat and to a pound of Meat take halfe a pound of the peel, MixThere is a smudge over the word "Mix" here them Well together & Set them upon the fier whilst you boyl your Sugar, you Must take the full weight in very fine Sugar, and boyl it to a high Candy, then put it to your Orrange, and Set it over a Slow fier for an hour, keep it Stiring all the while, but dont let it boyle; then put it into a pot to keep, and dry them out as you Mean to Use them, and then Lay it out in Spoonfuls upon Glasses, Stove them [file] one Side is dry, then burne them and Clap too together, Cloase them neatly with a knife, and dry them upThere is a flourish here on the next line, under the phrase "them up" add juice of Leaman when they are all mixt together and Set upon the fier.There is another flourish at the end of this recipe here

The folio number is 211r, the scribe number is 445.

The biler drinke for one thatis Paralettick.

Mrs Slocker. This attribution appears in the left hand margin and is underlined with a flourish. Take the tops of Roman Wormwood, and the lever Centrey of each too drams, of Gentian root Sliced and the roots of Virginian Snake Weed, (a little brused) of each a dram & a halfe, the outer rind of Sivel Orranges, Calamus arromaticus, the lesser Cardamum Seeds, of each a dram, pour upon these ingredients 3 pints of boiling Spring Water, when tis Could power it off, and put to it Compound Wormwood Water, & Steel Wine of each 8 ounces.

Almand Cheescakes.

Mrs Butler. This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Take 6 ounces of Almands, or penockeys, beat them Smal with Rose Water: then take [1] pint of Cream, 4 biskets Grated, 1 nutmeg, 8: eggs, but halfe the whits, and halfe a pound of buter, put all together in a Sace pan, and Set it on the fier till it grows thik, then put it into your Civet, & bake them in a Great one, or Small one as you like.There is a flourish at the end of the recipe here.

Sack Whay

Take 3 pints of Milke, 3 pints of Water, Set it upon the fier and when it boyls up pour in halfe a pint of Sack, take off the Curd, and so drinke it.

The Harts Horn drinke.

Take 1 ounce of burnt Hartshorne, a Civet of Whit bread, & a little Sinamon boyl them in 3 pints of Water till halfe bee wasted, then Sweeten it with [Coal] Suger.

Last edit over 3 years ago by HillaryNunn
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The folio number is 211v, the scribe number is 446.

Rice puden

H. Harrison. This attribution appears in the left hand margin and may be in a different pen or hand, hard to say. Take halfe a pound of Rice flower and a quart of Milk, boyl it to a hastey puden with a bit of buter to keep it from burning, then Stirr in the remainder of a pound of buter, and when tis Cool Stirr in 8 eggs, a little Suger and Salt, bake it.

The drying lime Water

H. Harrison. This attribution appears in the left hand margin. One pound of quik Lime to a Gallon of Water, let it Stand 3 days, then powr off as much as is Clean for your Use.There is a flourish at the end of this recipe here.

[Star] Jamm of Plums

L: Denbigh. This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Mussel Plums, and Pear Plums, Must have halfe the Weight of Suger, Damso[n] must have 3 pound of Plums to one pound of Suger, Make a thin Syrop With halfe a pint of Water to each pound of Suger, So boil it till tis enough.

Bisket.

Mrs Verney This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Break 6 Eggs whites & all into a Carge Carthen pot beat them a quarter: of an hour with a whiske, then put in 5 Spoonfull of Orrang flower Water, [...] beat it an other quarter: then put in by degreesThere is a smudge here over the "s" in degrees. a pound of fine loaf Suger, Searced, & keep beating an hour, then put in 14 ounces of fine flower beeing readey dryed by the fier, beat in in as fast as you Can, & when there is no dry flower to bee Sean, dope them upon paper buterd as fast as May bee, & bake them in a quik Oven put in Sim leaman peel Grated.There is a flourish at the end of the recipe here.

The folio number is 212r, the scribe number is 449.

Syrop of Steel

Dr Lower. This attribution appears in the left hand margin and may be in a different pen or hand. Take [s]: ounce of Steel fileings, put it into a pint of the Strongest Whit Wine, with halfe a dram of mace bruse'd, Let it Stand a month or 6 weeks, till the Wine bee of a darksih Colour then Philter it off through a Cap paper in a Glass funell, then put into it as much fine loaf Suger broaken in lumps as Will Make it into a thin Syrop without boyling. Of this Syrop take every morning one larg Spoonfull with 12: granes of Cream of Tartar, with it, you may mix it with fair Water, or aney Simple distil'd Water you like. If Syrop bee too heaveyThere is a smudge here over "heavey" for your Stomak, leave out the Suger, & use the deoction as above.There is a flourish here at the end of this recipe.

An Opening drinke.

Take green Elecompaney roots, Sliced, on pound, uncut SlyropIt seems that this word should be "Syrop," but there is something different happening with the "S" here. 4 handfulls, Storehoand 4 handfulls, Water Cresses and Seurnegrass Shred fine, of each 8 handfulls, rasins of the Sinn Stoned a pound, put these into a bagg & hang them in a Vessell of Small ale or Beer Wort, put the Bagg into the Vesel as Soon as it hath dun Working, and after 3 or 4 days you may drinke, if you keepe to this drinke only you will find the shone benfit, the Bag will Serve twice. only the Cast will not bee to strong.There is some sort of flourish here at the end.

A Wash for the teeth.

Ms Clarke. This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Take the botums of too Glas bottles, put them in the fier till they bee red hot, then put them into a quart of white Wine Vinegar, let them stand till tis Could throw out the Glass and Let the Liquor Settle, Strain off the Clear, and put into it an ounce and halfe of bold almorick, fine beaten, & a quarter of a pint of the juice of Sage, Wash your mouth with it once a Week, Shake it when you Use it. XThere is an "X" or cross at the end of this recipe here.

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The folio number is 212v, the scribe number is 450.

Orrang Marmalad.

Mrs Ffanshaw [...]Parlor This attribution appears in the left hand margin and is smudged greatly. pare your Orranges thin and rub them well with Salt, then put them into a large quantetey of Spring Water, let them ly a little while in the Water and then tie them up in a Cloth, and then boyl them in a great deal of Water, as the Water grows biter Change it, it usually require Changing 43 or 54 bones, when they are Very tender take them out of the Water, Cut them open and take out all the Skins & Seeds, reserve the meat to mix with the rinde, which Must bee broak very Smale, to every 3 orranges boyld, take the meat and juice of an Sivil Orrange and one Leaman, which must bee just boyld before it is Mixt with the broaken Orrange, when tis thus Mixt alltogether, take to every pint of Orrange a pint of Jelley Made with John apples, & to every pint of it So Mixt 3 quarter of a pound of Sugar, Stirr it well together, and Sett it over a quick fier, and boyl it till you find it will Jelley.

To Stop a Gangreen.

L: Longvill. This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Take Cow dung and put to it as much Spirit of Wine as will boyl it to a pultis, lay it to the part as hot as you Can bear it, shift it as off as it Cools till you find the part Sensible.

To dry up aney Feberish humor

Take 2 ounces of white lead Sifted fine, 2 ounces of Chalk, Seraped and Sifted, and 2 ounces of barr[er] greace, Mix them well together on the fier till it just Simmer, and then keep it in a pot for youe Use.There is a flourish here at the end of the recipe.

The folio number is 213r, the scribe number is 451.

To preserve orranges Whol.

L: Lansborough: This attribution appears in the left hand margin. Pare your Orranges very thin and lay them all night in Water[s] then boyl them halfe an hour and put them into Could Water. then make holes in the Stalk ends and take out the Seeds as Clean as you Can with the whit pulp only that is in the middle, let them ly in that water til the next day, then boyl them again allmoast halfe an hour then take them out and put them in a double napkin Coverd till they bee allmoast Could, then weigh them and put to every pound of Orranges a pound and halfe of Sugar, to the Sugar put a Wine pint and halfe of water boy your Syrop and Strain it, and when it is allmoast Could put in your orranges and boyl them with a Soft fierThere is blue stitching on this page, because papers have been sown onto the other side of the page. One of the stitches runs through the word "fier" here.till they look Clear and the Syrop bee at a good heith, about a fortnight or three weeks after takeA blue stitch appears here. your orranges out and boyl your Syrop and when tis Could put it into your orranges again. about halfe an hour or little more will boyl your orranges in the Syrop.There is another blue stitch here. There are also two blue stitches lower down on the page.

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Folio number 213v, Scribe's page 452.

L Lansborough. This attribution is in the left hand margin and written in a different hand than the recipe. There's also a flourish underneath the attribution. To make a Baked Pudding

Take some good Milk or Cream, according to the bigness of - your Pan [...] (mine is but a pinte and Half) and a stale Role of Bread sliced thin and the Boileing milk or Cream - poured hott upon it and when tis Cold add 4 Eggs - leaveing out two Whites well beaten and Mix them and a - good handfull of Currans and Raisons well Cleaned - and ston'd, and when you put into the Oven, put half a grated Nuttmegg, some sugar, and Melted Butter - with a spoonefull of Sack or Brandy all mixt well - together. as you put it into the Oven, Plump the fruit - before you Mix[...]This character looks crossed out itt, a Little Bakeing will Serve. You may make the Same Pudding boiled onely adding a little flower to Build it. Some times I put Marrow Instead of Butter, but think butter better.

This div is typed on a separate sheet of paper that has been threaded to the page, the thread running in diagonal fashion across the paper. ==At the Unicorn, over against the New Church, near the May-pole in the Strand, London, liveth I. Inglish from Edinburgh, who alone is Authorized by his MAJESTY to Make and Publish Dr. Anderson's, or, The Famous Scots PILLS:==

So universally known and approv'd by the most eminent Physicians and others of all Rank for their rare and singular Virtues; and particularly as a very Sovereign Remedy against Diseases or Pains in the Head, Stomach or Bellies of Men, Women and Children, but especially against Giddiness and Megrims, Palsy, Deafness, Weak or Blear'd Eyes, Want of Appetite, Choler, Melancholy, Phlegm, Gross and Thick Humours, Worms, Paleness, Green-Sickness, Barrenness, Defluctions on the Lungs or Joints, Rheumatism, Gout, Gravel, Stone, Scurvey, Droply, Cholick or Gripes, and all Obstructions; and the most effectual Remedy yet known for those that are Costive, and therefore convenient for all Travellers by Sea and Land. They are known also to be of excellent Use (Two or Three taken at Night) before drinking of Epsom, Tunbridge, or any other Medicinal Waters. They are so accomodated to all Ages, Seasons and Hours, that they are safely us'd by Women with Child, Infants, and decrepid old Persons, Summer or Winter, at any Time of the Day, without regard to Diet, or hindance of Business. Their Operation is so gentle, pleasant and effectual, that by Experience they are found to exceed any Medicine hitherto publish'd. The Dose is from 3 to 11 after Dinner, Supper, or hard Drinking, as may be seen more at large in my Papers of Directions given with the said Pills.

There's a manicule to indicate the indentation of a new paragraph here.Their Excellency is sufficiently demonstrated by the multitude of Counterfeits that endanger Peoples Lives; in order to prevent which, I have frequently given notice in the Gazette: But notwithstanding that, and my having the only true Receipt, and the King's Authority for publishing these excellent Pills; ye[t] there are some covetous Persons of late, who, tho they have been manifestly pro[ven] and publish'd Cheats and Impostors, have not only counterfeited them, but stollen [...] Title and Directions verbatim, and give them out with their Trash. Wherefore [...] prevent such Abu[s]es in the Country, the only true Pills are sold by Mr. Hodges B[...] feller in Derby; Mrs. Cockes in Shrewsbury; Mr. James Buchanan in Rochford; Mr. [...] liamWard Book[s]eller in Nottingham; Mr. Edmund Assheton at Preston in Lancashire; [...] Wyat in Worces[t]er; Mr. Richard Lowry Haberdasher of Small-Wares in Kendal, We[...] land; Mr. J[o]hn Addleton in St. Martins in Stamford, Lincolnshire; Mr. Smith in Ne[...] near Richm[on]d in Yorkshire; Mrs. May Bookseller in Exeter; Mrs. Banks's Coffee-[...] in the M[...]er-yard in York; Mrs. Keblewhite in Newport in the Isle of Wight; Mr. [...] Harris in Sarum; Mrs. Staples at Boston, New-England.

There's a manicule to indicate the indentation of a new paragraph here.To distinguish my Pills from those of Impostors, you are desir'd to take [...] That my Boxes are seal'd on the Top (with black Wax) with a Lion Rampa[...] Three Mullets Argent; Dr. Anderson's Head betwixt I.I. with his Name round [...] Isabella Inglish underneath the Shield in a Scroll. The typed page is wrinkled and folded over in the scanned image and therefore cuts off the ends of lines 61-78.

Folio number 214r, Scribe's page 453.

This div is a typed recipe on a clipping that has been threaded to the page and folded in half. The clipping is threaded in backwards, so the end of the article is upright on 214r, with the beginning of the article face down against the page. Starting with the front, at the top there is a picture that is framed with what looks like leaves. In the picture itself there are 3 tiers of Saints or Angels, with the fourth tier at the top appearing to be a depiction of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost (the Holy Ghost represented as the downward-facing Dove above what appears to be the Virgin Mary in the middle). Surrounding these tiers inside the frame are the words written in Latin: "Theriaca Fin a Alla Speciaria Del Paradiso In Rialto". Below the tiers there is a banner held between two angels that reads, "Soli Deo Gloria Et Honor" which is also Latin and means "To God Alone Be Glory and Honor". Below that is a small depiction of a lion inside of a circle, and below the lion along the bottom of the frame is written in Latin, "Sopra La Riva Delvin In Venetia". ==THIS Antidote is composed in VENICE with all dilligence by ANTHONY RAFFAELLI Apothecary at the Signe of il PARADISO at RIV' ALTO ! upon the Wine banck in the presence of the most Illustrious MAGISTRATE of the OLD IVSTICE, and the Excellent COLLEDGE of Doctors, Apothecarys and other Deputys for the Same, the Virtues of which videlicet.==

Below this opening is a picture of a winged lion with an open book at his feet. This appears to be the Lion of St. Mark, and the words on the pages of the book appear to read: "Pax tibi Marce, evangelista meus". At the top left edge of this picture is a handwritten attribution that appears to say "Mrs Toome,", though the "T" is unclear and could be a number of characters.

[T]HIS R[E]CIPE having been Counterfeit[ed] is the Occasion of this our neW Stan[d] for the Truth of which wee annex o[...] Seal in Margent. The unclear sections here are due to tears in the paper caused by the fold-line.

THIS TREACLE amongst all the other prerogatiues hath Virtue of preserueing from the Plague, and from all other Contagions, Keeping the Body Chearful and in Health. It is good against the beatings of the heart, or Ear Akeing, removing then[c]e Melancholy, Consumeing the putrified humors of the Body, expelling Euery vnwhole some superfluity of the Same, Keeping it wholsome, and strengthens admirably. It cures the Very PLAGVE, and other PESTILENTIAL DISEASES. It is good against all Biteings of VENEMOVS CREATVRES Especielly of Scorpions and Madd Doggs, and other forts of Beasts of both Land or water, Taken at the Mouth and apply'd to the wound on the out side. It p[r]eserues from Poisons, Taken before or when thereis suspition, and Especially after the Poison is discovered, In Which Case the Person must not omitt the takeing said Treacle inwardly often. It helps very much those that from, an Inward, and vnKnowneDesease, Consumes away as if they were poisoned. It is a singular Remedy against all Agues[,] preventing, the Rigour of the Fitt, Takeing this Treakle 3 or 4 times before the [f]itt begins. It cures the Q[u]artane Ague, but not in the beginning, the matter, and, Causebeing Raw. It preserues from Pestilent and Malignent Agues, and cures them. It expells the wind from the Stomack, it is good against the Paine in the Entrailes griping of the Gutts, Paine in the sides, occasioned from Vicers and thestone, it cures the Dropsie, and the Pthisich, in the beginning the Fitts taken. It strengthens the Eye sight, is excellent good for All Internal Diseases of the head, Falling sickness, Apoplexy, Palsey, stops the Flux, and Rheumes prouokeing Sleep. What follows is on the backside of the clipping. It is good against the paines in the Breast, Coughes and Colds. It conforts the Heart, preventing the burning, and trembling there of. It cures all'indispositions of the Stomach, As extreame hunger, or Loathsomeness, and strengthens the Vitall Parts. It Kills All sorts of Vermin, or worms, expells them out of the Body, and hinders their ingendring. It cures the Leprosie vsed often by the Patient. It provokes womens Termes, and the Stopped Flux of the Piles, or Emoroides, and what is wonderful! Stops the too! mach running of the same, Comforting Nature, weakned by both indispositions. It provokes the after Birth, and it helps to bring forth Dead Children haueing many other vertues, that for brevity dont mention, being a Reall and rare Medicine, well known to all agreeing with all Persons from, 7. years and vpwards, at any time taken.

THE DOSE.

To the young, and those of strong Complexions, 2 or 3 Scruples, Alone, in wine, Aqua Mulsa, or other liquor. To Aged People One dram, and the same Quantity for Poisons, or the Ague. But as a Preseruatiue onely, but one scruple, Haveing allways a Reguard to the Constitution of the Patient.

==THERIACA ANDROMACHI SENIORIS Divinum Inventum.==

LA THERIACA adunque tra l'altre sue prerogatiue ha virtudi preseruare gl'huomini dalla Peste, eda ogn'altro male Contagioso conseruandoh sani, & alegri. Gioua alle passioni dell'animo , rimouendo la Malinconia , consumaudogl'humori putridi del corpo , discacciando ogni inutile superfluita, con mantenerlo sano, fortifica mirabilmente. Cura l'istessa Peste, egl'altri mali contagiosi, pero e ottimo preseruatiue , e curatiuodi quella, e di simili Vale alle morsicature di tutti gli animali velenosi, & in particolare deg[il] Scorpioni, e del Can rabbioso, e degl'altri animali, tanto di Terra, che di Mare, pigliate per becca, & applicata di fuora sopra dette morsicature. Preserua da i Veleni, presa auanti quando si [l]ra sospetto, e si cura quando sossero stati diuorati, nel qual caso deue cercare l'infermodi vomitare, reiterando, piu volte il pigliar per bocca della sopradetta Theriaca. Gioua sommamente a quelli, cheda causa interna, & occulta si vanno consumando, come se fossero auuellenati. E remedio singolare a tutte le f[e]bri leuandone il tremore, rigore, o freddo; che durano longamente, pigliandone treo quatro volte auanti l'accesso. Sana ancola Quartana data nello stato vniuersale del male, e non nel principio, essend la materia cruda. Preserua dalle febri, Pestilenti, e maligne, e la cura. Risolue la ventosita dello stomaco Gioua alli dolori delle viscere, e delle reni cagionati da Vlcere, o dalla Pietra. Guarisce l'Idropisia, e la Tifica nel principio del male. Toglie dal petto la Marcia, e ferma gli sputi del sangue, tolta spesso per bocca da gl'Infermi. The unclear sections here are due to tears in the paper caused by the fold-line. It occurs between lines 119-124. [...][pu]menta la vist[a] [...][Si conviene a tutti si mali in][...] [...] apo, come a[i] [...]al caducho, Appoplesia, paralifia fermando [re] [...][i] Catarri con [...]citare il sonno. [in]serisce eccellentemente alle passioni del petto, alle tosle, & a i catarri. [con]forta mirabilmente il cuore, togliend[on]e la palpitatione. [...]a tutte l'indispositioni di stomacho, come la troppa same, innapetenza, nausea cacciandone la collera, e la p[il]trefazione, aiutando la concozione, con riscaldare, e fortificare le parti vitali. Ammazza tutte le forte de vermi, cacciandoli fuora del corpo, e n'impedisce la generatione. Cura la Lebra viata spesso da pazienti. Prouoca i Mestrui alle Donne, & il sopresso flusso dell'Emoroide. E que lo, ch'e di Marauiglia, restringe egualmente i souerchi flussi Emoroidali, che Mestrui, confortando la natura debilitata da ambedue indisposition[i], che rebusta abbraccia il medicamento. Prouoca le secondine, retenute, e manda fuori del Corpo delle Donne le Creature morte. Ha molte altre virtu, che per breuita si tralasciano, eslendo medicamento reale, Canonico, e notissimo a tutto il Mondo. Conferisce a tutte l'eta da sette anni sopra tutte le complessioni, e si da securamente in ogni tempo.

LA DOSE SARA'.

ALli giouani, e quelli di virile eta al pe[r]o due o tre scropoli sola, o con vino, o con aq[ua muls]a, o altro liquore. Alli vecchi 1. drama, & il medesimo peso si dara ne Veleni, nella Peste, e per preseruatiuo vno scropolo, hauedo sepre riguardo alla qualita della persona. UENETIA, M. DCCVII. Presso Domenico Milocho. Con Licenza de' Superiori.

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It is good against the paines in the Breast, Coughes and Colds. It conforts the Heart, preventing the burning, and trembling there of. It cures all'indispositions of the Stomach, As extreame hunger, or Loathsomeness, and strengthens the Vitall Parts. It Kills All sorts of Vermin, or worms, expells them out of the Body, and hinders their ingendring. It cures the Leprosie vsed often by the Patient. It provokes womens Termes, and the Stopped Flux of the Piles, or Emoroides, and what is wonderful! Stops the too! mach running of the same, Comforting Nature, weakned by both indispositions. It provokes the after Birth, and it helps to bring forth Dead Children haueing many other vertues, that for brevity dont mention, being a Reall and rare Medicine, well known to all agreeing with all Persons from, 7. years and vpwards, at any time taken.

THE DOSE.

To the young, and those of strong Complexions, 2 or 3 Scruples, Alone, in wine, Aqua Mulsa, or other liquor. To Aged People One dram, and the same Quantity for Poisons, or the Ague. But as a Preseruatiue onely, but one scruple, Haveing allways a Reguard to the Constitution of the Patient.

==THERIACA ANDROMACHI SENIORIS Divinum Inventum.==

LA THERIACA adunque tra l'altre sue prerogatiue ha virtudi preseruare gl'huomini dalla Peste, eda ogn'altro male Contagioso conseruandoh sani, & alegri. Gioua alle passioni dell'animo , rimouendo la Malinconia , consumaudogl'humori putridi del corpo , discacciando ogni inutile superfluita, con mantenerlo sano, fortifica mirabilmente. Cura l'istessa Peste, egl'altri mali contagiosi, pero e ottimo preseruatiue , e curatiuodi quella, e di simili Vale alle morsicature di tutti gli animali velenosi, & in particolare deg[il] Scorpioni, e del Can rabbioso, e degl'altri animali, tanto di Terra, che di Mare, pigliate per becca, & applicata di fuora sopra dette morsicature. Preserua da i Veleni, presa auanti quando si [l]ra sospetto, e si cura quando sossero stati diuorati, nel qual caso deue cercare l'infermodi vomitare, reiterando, piu volte il pigliar per bocca della sopradetta Theriaca. Gioua sommamente a quelli, cheda causa interna, & occulta si vanno consumando, come se fossero auuellenati. E remedio singolare a tutte le f[e]bri leuandone il tremore, rigore, o freddo; che durano longamente, pigliandone treo quatro volte auanti l'accesso. Sana ancola Quartana data nello stato vniuersale del male, e non nel principio, essend la materia cruda. Preserua dalle febri, Pestilenti, e maligne, e la cura. Risolue la ventosita dello stomaco Gioua alli dolori delle viscere, e delle reni cagionati da Vlcere, o dalla Pietra. Guarisce l'Idropisia, e la Tifica nel principio del male. Toglie dal petto la Marcia, e ferma gli sputi del sangue, tolta spesso per bocca da gl'Infermi. The unclear sections here are due to tears in the paper caused by the fold-line. It occurs between lines 119-124. [...][pu]menta la vist[a] [...][Si conviene a tutti si mali in][...] [...] apo, come a[i] [...]al caducho, Appoplesia, paralifia fermando [re] [...][i] Catarri con [...]citare il sonno. [in]serisce eccellentemente alle passioni del petto, alle tosle, & a i catarri. [con]forta mirabilmente il cuore, togliend[on]e la palpitatione. [...]a tutte l'indispositioni di stomacho, come la troppa same, innapetenza, nausea cacciandone la collera, e la p[il]trefazione, aiutando la concozione, con riscaldare, e fortificare le parti vitali. Ammazza tutte le forte de vermi, cacciandoli fuora del corpo, e n'impedisce la generatione. Cura la Lebra viata spesso da pazienti. Prouoca i Mestrui alle Donne, & il sopresso flusso dell'Emoroide. E que lo, ch'e di Marauiglia, restringe egualmente i souerchi flussi Emoroidali, che Mestrui, confortando la natura debilitata da ambedue indisposition[i], che rebusta abbraccia il medicamento. Prouoca le secondine, retenute, e manda fuori del Corpo delle Donne le Creature morte. Ha molte altre virtu, che per breuita si tralasciano, eslendo medicamento reale, Canonico, e notissimo a tutto il Mondo. Conferisce a tutte l'eta da sette anni sopra tutte le complessioni, e si da securamente in ogni tempo.

LA DOSE SARA'.

ALli giouani, e quelli di virile eta al pe[r]o due o tre scropoli sola, o con vino, o con aq[ua muls]a, o altro liquore. Alli vecchi 1. drama, & il medesimo peso si dara ne Veleni, nella Peste, e per preseruatiuo vno scropolo, hauedo sepre riguardo alla qualita della persona. UENETIA, M. DCCVII. Presso Domenico Milocho. Con Licenza de' Superiori.

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Needs Review

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Folio page 219r, Scribe's page 465.

Dr [Ratlifs] biter drinke that hee [Gave] mee for the Scorbutik pain in My [knees], takeing Stira picara one day first.

TakeThis is not an attribution. It is the first word in the first line of the recipe and it appears in the left hand margin.tope of [Cerbrey], & roman wormwood halfe an ounce; Gentian root one ounce and halfe Sliced; Corander Seed; the [lessen] Cardamums, of each one dram beat, infuse there in halfe a pinch of boiling Water, Then strain it out it must bee halfe a pint when Straind, then add to it Nephrebick Water, 6: ounces; Compound Pioney Water 2: ounces: take 4: 5: or 6: ounces Spoonfulls every Morning and 3 Spoonfulls everey eevening

Mrs Hardings backed Puden

Slice a penney loaf and power upon it a quart of Milk if Countrey Measur, 3 pints if London, Scalding hot; let it stand a little to Swell the bread, then break it well with a spoon, and while it is Warme put into it a pound of beef [Shred] very fine thred, and 6: eggs well beat a little salt nutmeg, & sugar, to your tast; backe it erthen in put past or offerways as you please.

Balle Bread

to too pound of flower as much Salt as will ly upon a halfe Crown, 2 great spoonfull of thik yest Web if fit to Make up with warm Milk, throw it upon a [dreeser], or in a bowl about 30 times then make it up.

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Folio page 220r, Scrbie's page 467.

A Whit pot A Harrison.This attribution appears in the same hand in the left margin. Take 3 pints of Cream, whol Sinamon a little nutmeg Sliced, and Scald it, haue a penney loaf Sliced Very thin, and the Marrow of too bones Slice the Marrow and lay that on the bottom of the dish upon the Marrow lay the bread, then Marrow again as before, to the 3 pints of Scalded Cream put 9 yolks of eggs well beaten with rose Water, Sweeten the Cream to your tast; with a little Salt, So fill up your dish With it, backe it and when it Comes out of the ouen Leavee a Very little fine Sugar upon it

What is this sorcery? A HarrissonThis attribution appears in the same hand in the left margin. To one pound of ??????????????: pints of Water, boyle it fast till it Couer to halfe the quantetey, let it Stand till tis Could, then blanch and beat halfe a pound of Sweet almonds, uery fine with Ourang flower Water to keep them white, then Melt your delley and and Stir it in, Sweeten it to your tast and put in Leamon peel if you like it, Strain it through a thin Cloth or fine Seiue, and Let it so Jelley, eat it with Cream or leamon Cream. You May doo the Same with Calfes foot broth.

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