Woodrow Wilson Papers Microfilm Reels

Pages That Need Review

Microfilm Reel 229, File 152, "African Americans"

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or a toothless serpent. SHAME! SHAME!! SHAME!!!

No man who knows the open-hearted honesty, trustworthiness, integrity and moral standing of the former slave, would for a moment be afraid to trust him with the ballot which made him feel that he was a man, and an American citizen. Where does he stand today? Would you march an army into battle without guns and amunition for self defense and expect to win a victory? The ballot has been and is today every man's strongest weapon of defense. Take that away and you unman him and leave him helpless and defenseless. No race is prouder of the government of the United States than the negro, and in proportion to numbers and material conditions, vies with any other race in a quick response to a call for its defense and support.

It seems to me that taxation and defense without representation, (the right to vote) is wrong. In many of the states we have the educational, the prepayment of taxes, and the property qualifications, as prerequisites to voting. If the negro had had the fruits of his labor and an equal chance in the race of life, since he has been in this country there would be no word of complaint against it. It is unreasonable to expect of the race in fifty years what it has taken other races all the ir lives to do. If the negro had been let alone, and had he divided his vote as other races, he never would have been disfranchised. I know this to be true, as I had the honor of attending and delivering an address before the Constitutional Convention which met at Richmond, Va., in theyears of 1901 and 1902, in the interest of the race.

For the last twenty-five or thirty years I have been a strong advocate of a division of the Negro Vote, because he has tried concentration and was made a political slave.

Following the same motives that promted me in the past, I spent a month in the campaign of 1912 in support of Messrs. WILSON and MARSHALL. The results of that campaign were so flattering and astounding that I am proud that I was in the fight, and my fondest hopes have been realized.

From the training, high character and christian sentiment expressed by President-elect WILSON, before and since his election, 1 see an OPEN DOOR OF HOPE for the Negro. I have often thought why it is, that so many hard, humiliating and discouraging things are said to keep the negro in the back-ground. We did not come to this country of our own choice; but since we have been here, we have served as BONDSMEN and FREEMEN. How well we have done both, will yet be written by the impartial historian, and acknowledged by all who love JUSTICE and RIGHT.

If the negro is to be repudiated and made the bone-of-contention, in the future, God will continue to open other doors of hope until we shall be recognized as American Citizens; and through the aid of those who may be in power, be given an equal chance

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in the race of life, and count for something in the community in which we may live.

The eyes of the world are now turned upon the incoming administration, and we hope that the confidence which the people so largely expressed at the recent election will not be misplaced, and that those who will soon take charge of the "Old Ship" of State will stick to the principles of the Fathers of this country, that this shall be a government of the people, for the people, and by the people.

William P. Morton. Washington, D. C. February 13th, 1913.

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COPY

# 406 "H" Street, N. W.,

WASHINGTON, D. C., Nov. 9,1812

His Excellency, Gov. WOODROW WILSON, Sea Girt, N. J.

Dear Sir:

Please accept my heartiest congratulations upon the magnificent and overwhelming victory you have achieved in being elected PRESIDENT of the UNITED STATES.

It was simply an uprising of the American People to bring the government back to themselves and make it a "government of the people, for the people, and by the people."

It is enough for me to know that you represent that type of "Virginia Gentleman" whose sense of honor and justice will not allow him to be swerved from the path of duty. For twenty years I have been hooked up in the Democratic harness and working like a "trojan" for democratic control of all branches of the government. My fondest hopes have been realized--, The mantle has fallen upon your shoulders.

Hoping that your administration may be peaceful, happy and prosperous, believe me to be

Most respectfully yours, (Signed) Wm. P. Morton.

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[stamp] ACK'D MAR 18 1913

[stamp] THE WHITE HOUSE MAR 18 1913 RECEIVED

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Hon. Joceph Tumulty, Secretary to the President, Washington, D. C.

My dear Mr. Tumulty:-

I hope I may secure your pardon for the intrusion of this letter, but I know of no other way of getting some facts before the President, and am, therefore, relying upon your good office to call them to his attention.

1 have seen a clipping from the Washington Evening Star in which my name is alleged to have been presented for the position of Assistant Register of the Treasury. I desire to state that I have authorized no one to present my name for any office nor am I a candidate for this position.

During the last campaign I organised and was elected president of the Wilson Colored Democratic Club of Greater New York. I was prompted to organize in this way because it was apparent that members of colored men in this city would vote for Mr. Wilson who would not join any organization affiliated with Tammany Hall--as is the United Colored Democracy. It was in no spirit of opposition

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Brooklyn, N. Y. ____________ 191

to the United Colored Democrary that this club was organized, but rather in a spirit of cooperation and for the purpose of bringing to the support of our case and candidates every colored man who could possibly be won over. Bichop Walters will inform you of the service rendered by our organization to the ticket. During the campaign we worked harmoniously under the Leadership of the Bishop and in cooperation with the National Colored Democratic League, but as soon as the election was over, Robert N. Wood, Chief of the United Colored Democracy, sought to have all of these useful agencies made subordinate to the organization of which he was the leader, and aspired to be the boss. I was naturally adverse to dropping the organization of which I was president, and for that reason incurred Mr. Wood's displeasure. Whereupon he demanded of Tammany Hall that the Superintendent of Elections, in those office I was serving as a deputy, should remove me from service. Superintendent Voorhis reluctantly complied with this demand, but did me the honor of attesting to the satisfactory manner in which I had performed my duties. Bishop Walters protested against this injust and un-Democratic action, but to no avail. The leader of the Colored Tammany Auxiliary (the United Colored Democracy) could endure no organization which could not take

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Brooklyn, N. Y. ____________ 191

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its orders from him, no matter how much real service that organization might have rendered to the party. As it is my desire to have my name considered for some post under President Wilson’'s administration I naturally feel that I should like to have the President know the circumstances uuder which I was removed from the position of Deputy State Superintendent of Elections and the penalty I had to pay for doing all in my power to advance the cause of Democracy anong my people. I am sending you clippings from The New York Age and Washington Bee the two leading newspapers edited by men of my race which will testify as to the truthfulness of these representations.

With best wishes for your success in your new position, I am, with great respect, yours very truly,

Ralph E. Langston, 24 West 132nd St., New York City.

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[column 1]

OUST LOCAL DEMOCRATS

Ralph E. Langston and A. M. Robinson Are Summarily Dismissed

A BIG LOCAL FIGHT ON

Discharged as Deputies in State Superintendent of Elections Office at Instance of R. N. Wood

Ralph E. Langston and A. M. Robinson, two of the most active and wellknown colored Democrats in Greater New York, have been summarily dismissed as deputies in the office of the State Superintenent of Elections. Judging from the many expressions of disapproval made by local colored Democrats over the move, the ousting of Langston and Robinson without apparent good cause will precipitate internal dissensions in the ranks of the colored Democracy of both New York and Brooklyn which will rival in a small way the civil war now going on in Mexico.

[photo of Ralph E. Langston]

Robert N. Wood, local head of the United Colored Democracy in New York City, is again charged with making another idiotic move which will only tend to weaken the influence of the colored Tammany organization. Since becoming the head of the local Democracy, Wood has been accused from time to time of allowing his personal feelings to get the better of his good judgment, thereby playing amateurish politics and doing Tammany Hall, which in the past has been given strong support by the colored voters, irreperable injury.

Wood is accused of trying to kill off all influential colored Democrats who do not loudly proclaim him the monarch of all he surveys, and he is said to be responsible for the removal of Lankston and Robinson. Ever since the dinner tendered Bishop Walters by the leading Negro citizens of Greater New York, the discharge of Langston and Robinson, his particular reason for desiring their dismissal being that they attended the Walters banquet and were friendly to Woodrow Wilson.

President of Woodrow Wilson Club. Ralph E. Langston is president of the Wilson Colored Democratic Club of [/column 1]

[column 2] ored Democrats in New York, and has been associated with Tammany Hall for thirteen years. For twelve years he was Chief Edward E. Lee's right-hand man and was chairman of the Executive Committee of the United Colored Democracy, which made him next in power to Lee. Last year when Wood defeated Lee for chief, Langston retired as a member of the executive board of the United Colored Democracy.

A. M. Robinson, who is leader of his district, the Eleventh, was told by Chief Wood at a meeting of the executive committee of the United Colored Democracy last Friday evening that he (Robinson) had been dismissed because he attended the Walters banquet, although he had been instructed to remain away.

Claims Robinson Should Not Have Attended Banquet.

At the meeting Robinson introduced a resolution demanding that Wood make specific the charges which brought about his dismissal, but he was thwarted by Wood, who set forth that Robinson had been disloyal to the organization by attending the Walters banquet, thereby associating with those inimical to the organization. Wood further declared that had Robinson come to him instead of seeking outside infinence to hold his job maybe he would be working. Mr. Robinson has been associated with Tammany Hall for thirteen years.

Although Wood repeatedly demanded the removal of Langsion since the organization of the Wilson Club, and sought to secure Robinson's dismissal since the Walters banquet, Superintendent Voorhis refused to consider Wood seriously, maintaining that Langston and Robinson were giving entire satisfaction and they were rated with the best deputies in the office.

Failing in his efforts to have Mr. Voorhis discharge the two deputies, Wood is said to have gone to Chief Murphy of Tammany Hall and trumped up charges against Lankston and Robinson, which ultimately led to their removal. Monday morning Anthony Brown of the Sixteenth Assembly District and William Smith of the Thirty-first Assembly District, went to work as deputies in Voorhis' office. They were appointed by Wood.

Questions Who is Who.

The policy of the Democratic party of Greater New York is in the event of victory to give different organizations such as Hebrew, Hungarian and Negro Democrats, certain patronage. When Dix was elected Governor, certain places in the State Bureau of Elections were given to Edward E. Lee, who was the Chief of the United Colored Democracy for his organization. Lee appointed Ralph E. Langston and A. M. Robinson, both of whom have made good.

The actions of Wood in talking peace one day to the local colored Democrats not identified with his organization and his outward enmity toward Bishop Walters and other Wilson men seems to puzzle many politicians. Wood is said to boast that the United Colored Democracy is the only bona fide colored Democratic organization in New York, and is said to invariably refer to all others as fakes.

Despite the alleged assertion that Wood brands his organization as the only real thing, yet he is said to be an aspirant for a political position under Wilson, as are several other men in his organization, Messrs. Hughes and Morton being among the number, it is charged.

Ralph E. Langston was not on the payroll during the last Presidential campaign, as were aspiring colored Democrats, but contributed to both the national and local Democratic campaign funds.

Robert N. Wood is an inspector of vaults under Borough President George McAneny, who is a reformer of the first water. Those aware of Mr. McAneny's aversion to employees in his departments spending their time other than in the performance of their duties for which they are paid by the city are wondering how Wood finds time to go to Albany, Washington and other cities in missions of political nature. [/column 2]

[column 3] The New York Age (Member of the National Press Association) THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1913

Entered at the Post Office in New York as Second Class Matter. Published on Thursday every week by Fred E. Moore, 347 W. 40th Street, New York.

Fred M. Moore . . . . . . Publisher and Editor Lester A. Walton . . . . . Managing Editor T. Thomas Fortune . . . Associate Editor Jerome B. Peterson . . . Treasurer Eugene L. Moore . . . . . Advertising Agent Telephone, Bryant 3815 _______________________

DIVIDING HIS PARTY.

It is difficult to believe that Robert N. Wood, leader of the United Colored Democracy, fully understands the logic contained in the oft-repeated saying, "in union there is strength." To judge from his actions, one even finds it quite a task assuming that Mr. Wood is thoroughly acquainted with the name of the organization of which he is the head— the United Colored Democracy.

Since he has been chief of the local colored Democracy Mr. Wood has done much to stir up internal strife in the ranks of his organization. Instead of trying to bring all warring factions together, his policy has been to drive them further apart. It is the wise and farsighted leader who seeks to calm the troubled waters and placates all disturbing elements. He knows he can wield greater influence by leading a united body and that a divided force loses much of its effectiveness.

The zeal and energy displayed by Robert N. Wood in ultimately securing the dismissal of two prominent colored Democrats—Ralph E. Langston and A. M. Robinson—as deputies in the office of State Commissioner of Elections, will probably serve as a boomerang and react with telling effect, for it is said that the dismissal of these prominent Democrats was due to personal reasons. One of them aroused Mr. Wood's ire by becoming president of a Woodrow Wilson club, while the other is said to have "committed a grave offense" by attending a banquet to Bishop Alexander Walters. Has politics reached such a stage that one holding a political position must first obtain permission from leaders to attend affairs of a social nature? Has an officeholder any right to his opinion? Are the descendants of slaves to be more autocratic and domineering than the slaveholders themselves?

[/column 3]

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[column 1]

fice at Instance of R. N. Wood

WOODROW WILSON THE CAUSE

Ralph E. Langston is Head of a Wilson Club—A. M. Robinson Attended the Walters Banquet.

Ralph E. Langston and A. M. Robinson, two of the most active and wellknown colored Democrats in Greater New York, have been summarily dismissed as deputies in the office of the State Superintenent of Elections. Judging from the many expressions of disapproval made by local colored Democrats over the move, the ousting of Langston and Robinson without apparent good cause will precipitate internal dissensions in the ranks of the colored Democracy of both New York and Brooklyn which will rival in a small way the civil war now going on in Mexico.

[photo of Ralph E. Langston]

Robert N. Wood, local head of the United Colored Democracy in New York City, is again charged with making another idiotic move which will only tend to weaken the influence of the colored Tammany organization. Since becoming the head of the local Democracy, Wood has been accused from time to time of allowing his personal feelings to get the better of his good judgment, thereby playing amateurish politics and doing Tammany Hall, which in the past has been given strong support by the colored voters, irreperable injury.

Wood is accused of trying to kill off all influential colored Democrats who do not loudly proclaim him the monarch of all he surveys, and he is said to be responsible for the removal of Lankston and Robinson. Ever since the dinner tendered Bishop Walters by the leading Negro citizens of Greater New York, the discharge of Langston and Robinson, his particular reason for desiring their dismissal being that they attended the Walters banquet and were friendly to Woodrow Wilson.

President of Woodrow Wilson Club.

Ralph E. Langston is president of the Wilson Colored Democratic Club of Greater New York, which was organized during the recent Presidential campaign, with headquarters at 417 Carlton aveenue, Brooklyn. Wesley L. Young, the leader of the colored Democrats of Brooklyn, and who is deputy in the State Superintendent of Elections Department heads the executive committee of the organization of which Bishop Walters is head, having succeeded Wood last summer, who was removed by the executive committee. 83414

It is charged that after Wood found he was unable to control the Walters organization he became inimical toward all colored Democrats who worked to secure the election of Woodrow Wilson. As Ralph E. Langston is president of the Wilson Colored Democratic Club of Greater New York, he therefore occasioned Wood's displeasure. Mr. Langston is one of the most infulential col-

[column 2]

had been disloyal to the organization by attending the Walters banquet, thereby associating with those inimical to the organization. Wood further declared that had Robinson come to him instead of seeking outside infinence to hold his job maybe he would be working. Mr. Robinson has been associated with Tammany Hall for thirteen years.

Although Wood repeatedly demanded the removal of Langsion since the organization of the Wilson Club, and sought to secure Robinson's dismissal since the Walters banquet, Superintendent Voorhis refused to consider Wood seriously, maintaining that Langston and Robinson were giving entire satisfaction and they were rated with the best deputies in the office.

Failing in his efforts to have Mr. Voorhis discharge the two deputies, Wood is said to have gone to Chief Murphy of Tammany Hall and trumped up charges against Lankston and Robinson, which ultimately led to their removal. Monday morning Anthony Brown of the Sixteenth Assembly District and William Smith of the Thirty-first Assembly District, went to work as deputies in Voorhis' office. They were appointed by Wood.

Questions Who is Who.

The policy of the Democratic party of Greater New York is in the event of victory to give different organizations such as Hebrew, Hungarian and Negro Democrats, certain patronage. When Dix was elected Governor, certain places in the State Bureau of Elections were given to Edward E. Lee, who was the Chief of the United Colored Democracy for his organization. Lee appointed Ralph E. Langston and A. M. Robinson, both of whom have made good.

The actions of Wood in talking peace one day to the local colored Democrats not identified with his organization and his outward enmity toward Bishop Walters and other Wilson men seems to puzzle many politicians. Wood is said to boast that the United Colored Democracy is the only bona fide colored Democratic organization in New York, and is said to invariably refer to all others as fakes.

Despite the alleged assertion that Wood brands his organization as the only real thing, yet he is said to be an aspirant for a political position under Wilson, as are several other men in his organization, Messrs. Hughes and Morton being among the number, it is charged.

Ralph E. Langston was not on the payroll during the last Presidential campaign, as were aspiring colored Democrats, but contributed to both the national and local Democratic campaign funds.

Robert N. Wood is an inspector of vaults under Borough President George McAneny, who is a reformer of the first water. Those aware of Mr. McAneny's aversion to employees in his departments spending their time other than in the performance of their duties for which they are paid by the city are wondering how Wood finds time to go to Albany, Washington and other cities in missions of political nature.

[column 3]

union there is strength." To judge from his actions, one even finds it quite a task assuming that Mr. Wood is thoroughly acquainted with the name of the organization of which he is the head— the United Colored Democracy.

Since he has been chief of the local colored Democracy Mr. Wood has done much to stir up internal strife in the ranks of his organization. Instead of trying to bring all warring factions together, his policy has been to drive them further apart. It is the wise and farsighted leader who seeks to calm the troubled waters and placates all disturbing elements. He knows he can wield greater influence by leading a united body and that a divided force loses much of its effectiveness.

The zeal and energy displayed by Robert N. Wood in ultimately securing the dismissal of two prominent colored Democrats—Ralph E. Langston and A. M. Robinson—as deputies in the office of State Commissioner of Elections, will probably serve as a boomerang and react with telling effect, for it is said that the dismissal of these prominent Democrats was due to personal reasons. One of them aroused Mr. Wood's ire by becoming president of a Woodrow Wilson club, while the other is said to have "committed a grave offense" by attending a banquet to Bishop Alexander Walters. Has politics reached such a stage that one holding a political position must first obtain permission from leaders to attend affairs of a social nature? Has an officeholder any right to his opinion? Are the descendants of slaves to be more autocratic and domineering than the slaveholders themselves?

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do HAIR CURING and SCALP HAIR STAIG Specialty.

Coronet Braids Work done at Reaso

[image of braids] THE Parted from forehead back o made can be combed and washed SPECIAL SALE ON O [image of Patti Wig] The New Pat Price, $12.00 NOW est creole wig washed and com in any style

[images of switces of transformation] Transformation Ear to ear or al crimpy or creol ed and combe

[image of Front Part Piece] Front Part Pieces [image of switch] Switches Switches or Pla $5.00 and up. We mak to order. Mixed G washed. Prices acc

All our goods ing and to ret

an the approved developments teaching science.

The pupils are encouraged to becom members of the Public Library, becau reading not only is the basis of men and intellectural progress, but it mak the mastering of daily school lesso much easier to the pupil. Their libra cards are constantly in use, and a go grade of literature is imbibed.

Mr. Telluson has established t system of Merit List, whereon t names of all the boys who are regul in attendence and orderly in behavi are enrolled monthly. This is an i centive to the boys, and its good res is plainly apparent. In addition to t

[column 2] WOOD CENSURED BY BROOKLYN DEMOCRATS

Regular Colored Democratic Association of Kings County Adopts Resolutions Protesting Against Discharge of Langston and Robinson.

A resolution consuring Robert N. Wood, leader of the United Colored Democracy of New York, for securing the dismissal of Ralph E. Langston and Andrew M. Robinson was adopted at the regular meeting of the Regular Colored Democratic Association of Kings County, held Tuesday evening at the organization's club rooms, 417 Carlton avenue, Brooklyn.

Two thirds of the enrolled colored Democrats of Kings County were present. Many who made speeches declared that Wood was injuring the Democratic Party by playing petty politics.

The resolution:

WHEREAS, it has been called to the attention of this Association that two sterling Democrats in the person of Ralph E. Langston and Andrew M. Robinson, former Deputy State Superintendents of Elections, were removed from their positions because of the loyalty to our National Leader Bishop Walters, and because of the interest they took in the organization of the Wilson Colored Democratic Club of New York, to support the candidacy of Hon. Woodrow Wilson, for President of the United States, this incurring the displeasure of Robert N. Wood of the Manhattan colored organtration: and

WHEREAS, The methods adopted to secure the removal of Mr. Langston and Mr. Robinson were unfair and undemocratic and the representation made to enforce their removal, to wit: that they failed to give or contribute to the Democratic organization was false and untrue.

BE IT RESOLVED. That this Association registers its protest against the removal of Messrs. Langston and Robinson and deplores the fact that the Democrats of Manhattan sustain a leadership so barren of the essential elements to lead as was demonstrated in the last election.

RESOLVED. That Bishop Walters be requested to place Messrs. Langston and Robinson in such positions within his gift as their talents merit, and that a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the Hon. Charles F. Marphy.

Wesley L. Young, who is the colored Democratic leader in Kings County, and who is a deputy in the office of the State Superintendent of Elections, was among those who favored the adoption of the resolution. Not only are the colored Democrats of Brooklyn aroused over the dismissal of Langston and Robinson, but in New York the colored Tammanyites and Wilson men do not hesitate to criticize Wood's actions. A lively political war is threatened.

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[upside down paragraph] Thumb's Wedding at the Lafay Presbyterian Church for the benefi the Reservation Fund. The child are being well trained.

Sacrament will be administred the Lafayette Presbyterian Chu Sunday, March 2, at the morning vice.

Roundtree & Golden celebrated fifth anniversary of the Golden Inn Monday night, February 24 place of business, 381 Jack avenue. A large number of friends and customers were pre and all present had a fine time. So enirs were given each guest.

Mrs. M. C. V. Clemons of Kings N. Y. has returned home after spe ing a week as the guest of Mrs. Be Williams-Oliver, 23 Oak street. Clemons has been in the metrop the past few weeks undergoing tr ment at the Post Graduate Hospital irities, having had to cancel all her gagements for the season. _______________________________ PHILADELPHIA, PA. Philadelphia, Pa. Feb. 25—At recent elections of officers of the V ing Workers' Club of Jerico Ba Church the following officers

THE BEE

Published at 1109 Eye St. N. W., Washington, D. C.

W. CALVIN CHASE, EDITOR

[Photo of Ralph E. Langston] RALPH E. LANGSTON.

It is a strange thing when we come to consider the alliance of colored men to the Democratic party, and strange as it is, it is a fact. The subject of this editorial is Mr. Ralph E. Langston, who has been associated with the Democratic party of the State of New York; a young man of ability and influence among his people. He is respected by the most influential and prominent white Democrats in the State of New York, and highly commended by those under whom he has served in the many official positions in his State. It is said that every position he has held in the city of New York has been conducted in a highly commendble manner; so much so that the socalled leader of the colored Democracy, Robert N. Wood, became envious and jealous of his power among the Negro Democracy in the State. For many years Mr. Langston, although a citizen and property owner in this city, has affiliated and worked with the Democracy of his State. He was far-sighted enough to be the first Negro in the city of New York to organize Wilson and Marshall Democratic Club. This was the cause of Robert N. Wood to misrepresent him to the Tammany chief, Mr. Murphy for whom Mr. Langston

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1251 South 18th Street PHILADELPHIA PA. March 17, 1913.

Joseph P. Tumulty, Esq., Secretary to the President, Washington, D.C.

[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE MAR 18 1913 RECEIVED]

My dear Mr. Tumulty:-

I am sending, in your special care, another letter to President Wilson. I wish you would kindly read this letter, and the enclosed newspaper clipping, with care yourself before bringing it to the attention of the President, because it takes up the question of Negro political patronage, with which I learn you are already much beset, and which I very much fear is being handled from the outside in a way that is most likely to embarrass both the Negro race and the Democratic Administration.

If you will give this matter your earnest attention I trust that I will not again soon find myself called upon to intrude upon your generosity of nature.

Your humble servant,

J. S. Stemon

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